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Aemetis licenses Chevron jet and diesel fuels production technology

23 August 2012

Renewable chemical and advanced fuels company Aemetis has signed a licence agreement with Chevron Lummus Global (CLG) to produce cost effective renewable jet and diesel fuel, by converting existing biofuels and petroleum refineries.

"The process uses water as a catalyst to convert plant oils into intermediate oil products, which are processed to produce drop-in jet fuel and diesel."

Aemetis Advanced Fuels will use a CLG and Applied Research Associates (ARA)-developed biofuels isoconversion process to manufacture 100% drop-in renewable jet fuel and diesel in Aemetis biorefineries throughout North America, as part of the agreement.

Leon de Bruyn, CLG managing director, said the biofuels isoconversion process is different from other licensed technologies in that the biodiesel and biojet produced from the unit are truly fungible fuel products, meeting all ASTM and military quality specifications.

"This offers our clients a unique advantage by eliminating the need to blend petroleum derived diesel and jet into biofuels to meet current quality requirements," Bruyn added.

Chuck Red, ARA programme manager, said: "As an experienced biofuels company that is already operating refineries in the US and Asia, Aemetis brings significant momentum to the commercialisation of this revolutionary renewable jet and diesel fuel production process developed by Chevron Lummus Global and ARA."

Eric McAfee, Aemetis chairman and CEO, said the technology is suited for the conversion of existing biofuels production facilities by utilising the rail siding, feedstock unloading, raw material storage tanks, power generation units, Clean In Place system, neat fuel storage tanks and loadout equipment.

"Expanding or converting existing biofuels and refining facilities to use the Biofuels ISOCONVERSION Process accelerates the scale up of production to supply the 70 billion gallon per year global market for jet fuel and the 50 billion gallon US market for diesel," McAfee added.

The process uses water as a catalyst to convert plant oils into intermediate oil products, which are processed to produce drop-in jet fuel and diesel.